Losing a Library

My daughter is graduating from high school this spring. For all the new beginnings such an event promises, for parents there is also a sense of impending loss: perhaps one less lunch to pack each day, or one less person at the dinner table. For me, there’s an additional loss:  access to the school library.

As you might have guessed, I am a big fan of libraries. In Basel, my public library has a fabulous collection—in German. Granted, each branch has a small collection in English—one even has a very nice fiction selection—but access to the school library brought me access to a complete library: fiction, non-fiction, periodicals, databases, etc., all in English.

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As an international school library*, it has a broad scope, and the fiction collection features authors from a great many countries. I have discovered Canadian authors, Australian authors, and a host of other authors whose work had been translated into English.

I have a good relationship with the library staff; I probably check out more books than any other parent at the school. I could read about a book, suggest it to them, and, most of the time, they would not only order it but let me know when it had arrived. Reading a “Best of YA” list would send me to the online catalog to see what they had or to the librarians to check what was on their upcoming order list in order to get books I thought my daughter would like.They were also very nice about renewing (and re-renewing) books for me. Best of all, at the end of the school year, my daughter and I could check out an unlimited number of books for the summer. I think our record was thirty ( yes, 30).

With just seven weeks until the end of exams and thus the end of school enrollment, all that access is also coming to an end, so I am reading as fast as I can. Come mid-June, I may be signing up for my first GGG library card.

*Check out International School Library Month, celebrated each October

 

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My Favourite Day

Basel bills fasnacht as the three most beautiful days of the year (die drei schönsten Tage). It’s colourful and great fun and all that, but one of my favourite days of the year in Basel is actually the Anglican Church Christmas Bazaar.

It’s held each year on a Saturday in late November, and for me it’s a reminder that the expat community here is not unlike small-town America at their annual Peach Festival. I see all sorts of people I know – from friends from our Montessori kindergarten days to friends I’ve only met recently.  It’s fun to check in and catch up with everyone…after I’ve visited the upper floor.

My first stop is always the book sale upstairs. This being Switzerland, the books are organized not only by general category but also, within fiction, somewhat alphabetically. Therefore, if you’re looking to read something new by Tracy Chevalier, you can head right to the C’s and cross your fingers you got there before it was snatched up by another fan.

I adore watching the older ladies and gents armed with lists of authors they like and books in a series they’re looking for. I love picking up a book I’ve read and loved and recommending it to the stranger next to me. And I absolutely buy too many books each year, but with 10 for 15 chf, how can you go wrong?!

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Okay, so maybe things are getting a bit out hand…